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RANDY fellas may soon be able to rub a contraceptive gel into their arms to stop their partners getting pregnant.
The ointment has a hormone that cuts men’s sperm count to zero and could replace the Pill, the snip and condoms.
Scientists now want 80 couples for a two-year trial.
Edinburgh University’s Prof Richard Anderson — who helped develop it — said: “It will let men share responsibility for avoiding unwanted pregnancies and give control over when to become a dad.
“And a gel may be more convenient than the repeated injections of previous trials.”
The gel takes four months to completely halt sperm production.
Sperm levels should return to normal about six months after daily treatment is stopped.
It could be available in three to five years.
Prof Anderson’s colleague, Dr Cheryl Fitzgerald of Manchester’s St Mary’s Hospital, added: “Contraceptive options for men are limited to condoms and vasectomies.
“This will let them control their fertility in a safe, simple way.”
Bekki Burbidge, of the Family Planning Association, hailed the trials.
She said: “Lots of men would be interested in new contraception that eases the responsibility on their partners. But it doesn’t protect against STIs, so it’s important to still use condoms.”

ARM AND A LEGOVER! Gel that men rub on their limbs could become the new male contraceptive

RANDY fellas may soon be able to rub a contraceptive gel into their arms to stop their partners getting pregnant.
The ointment has a hormone that cuts men’s sperm count to zero and could replace the Pill, the snip and condoms.
Scientists now want 80 couples for a two-year trial.
Edinburgh University’s Prof Richard Anderson — who helped develop it — said: “It will let men share responsibility for avoiding unwanted pregnancies and give control over when to become a dad.
“And a gel may be more convenient than the repeated injections of previous trials.”
The gel takes four months to completely halt sperm production.
Sperm levels should return to normal about six months after daily treatment is stopped.
It could be available in three to five years.
Prof Anderson’s colleague, Dr Cheryl Fitzgerald of Manchester’s St Mary’s Hospital, added: “Contraceptive options for men are limited to condoms and vasectomies.
“This will let them control their fertility in a safe, simple way.”
Bekki Burbidge, of the Family Planning Association, hailed the trials.
She said: “Lots of men would be interested in new contraception that eases the responsibility on their partners. But it doesn’t protect against STIs, so it’s important to still use condoms.”

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